Osteopathy fit to run

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Osteopathy to prevent sports injuries

Are the British still up and running?

One of the amazing, lasting benefits of the 2012 London Olympics appears to be the dramatic influence that it had on the physical activity of the British.  Previously nonchalant armchair sports men and women were said to be springing into action, throwing themselves onto running tracks, bikes and tennis courts, launching themselves off diving boards and jumping into swimming pools, canoes and rowing boats.  The  Health Survey for England trend tables for 2012  was compiled too soon after the Olympics to know if there really had been a positive effect on physical activity in the population and it showed no real difference between the levels of activity in 2008 and 2012. In December this year we will get a better idea of the Olympic effect when the statistics for 2013 are released. Will Britain really be up and running and if so how long will it last?

Armchair sportsman who take up sport, have a higher risk of injury

It is well established that the armchair sportsman who suddenly precipitates himself onto the sports field with no preparation, stands a fairly high chance of having to sit back down equally quickly due to injury.  Even if people warm up first and prepare for taking up a new sport, statistics may well show that the Olympic effect has also resulted in an increase in exercise related injuries. The most common exercise related injuries are ankle sprains,  groin strains, pulled hamstrings, shin splints, knee injuries and tennis elbow.  The Daily Telegraph reported that sports injuries resulted in 30 million lost working days in the UK in 2002 and the USA lost 147 million workdays due to sports injuries in 2004.

Which therapies can help help treat sports injuries?

Osteopathy, physiotherapy, sports,Osteopathy, physiotherapy, sports massage and kinesiology taping are well established therapies for sports injuries and a recent study showed that manual therapies are a cost effective option for musculo-skeletal problems.  Can these therapies also be used to prevent the sports injury in the first place?

Can Osteopathy help reduce stress fractures in Sportsmen and Women?

A paper published in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association reported on a study that investigated the benefits of an osteopathic manipulative treatment to prevent stress fractures in athletes.  The study was carried out over five years and the results were compared with information that had been compiled from eight years previously.  Results showed that there was a  reduction in the cumulative annual incidence of stress fractures in the men who followed the treatment but not in women.  An earlier study published in the same journal investigated the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment before matches to restore pain free movement in American footballers.  The study was carried out over two football seasons and the results showed that the pre-match treatments also led to improvements in the players' performance.

All this suggests that if you are heading from your armchair to a sports field or gym after many years of inactivity, it may well be worth popping in to see the osteopath or chiropractor on your way.

Read more articles on Osteopathy:

OSTEOPATHY IMPROVES HEART RATE VARIABILITY

 MANUAL THERAPY ‘BOOT CAMP’ REDUCES PAIN

 EMPLOYERS AND GOVERNMENTS SHOULD FOCUS ON MANUAL THERAPY FOR MUSCULOSKELETAL PROBLEMS

 WHAT IS  OSTEOPATHY?

Read more articles on Exercise:

 WATER EXERCISE FOR BETTER SLEEP AND LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE

 TENNIS TRAINING COULD BE AS GOOD AS TRADITIONAL PROGRAMS FOR REHABILITATION AFTER HEART ATTACKS

 EXERCISE REDUCES ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS

References:

Tsertsvadze et al. Cost-effectiveness of manual therapy for the management of musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of evidence from randomized controlled trials.

Brumm et al. Preventive osteopathic manipulative treatment and stress fracture incidence among collegiate cross-country athletes.

 

 

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