Gout – Food & Supplements

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 Gout - Food & Supplements

Tart cherry (Prunus cerasus)

We found two studies that looked at the effects of cherry intake on gout.  The first aimed to investigate the effect of tart cherry juice on uric acid levels, and found that it didn't have a significant effect on normal uric acid levels, but did significantly reduce the levels that were recorded as high before treatment.  In addition, it found that the tart cherry had antioxidant properties, which were absent in the conventional treatment used.  The second study looked at whether cherry consumption decreased the risk of recurrent gout attacks.  633 patients with gout took part in the study.  Over a two day period a 35% reduction in risk of recurrence was associated with cherry intake, as opposed to no intake, and increased to 75% when combined with the use of allopurinol.  The findings suggest that cherry consumption is associated with a lower risk of gout attacks.

 

Onion

A study that looked at how onion may affect levels of uric acid found that not only did it have a reducing effect, but also seemed to inhibit the activity of enzymes that can lead to uric acid forming, making it less potent than allupurinol.

 

Orange juice

Patient QI found a study that looked at the effects of orange juice on uric acid levels and enzyme activity that can lead to gout.  It found that orange juice increased antioxidant levels and decreased enzyme activity.  The study also looked at hesperetin effects, which is found in orange juice, although these results were weaker than orange juice itself.  A control group using allopurinol showed much more significant effects on uric acid levels than that of orange juice and hesperetin, but did not significantly change the enzyme activity.  The study concluded that orange juice and hesperetin are an attractive preventative treatment against gout particularly if they are taken on a long term basis.

 

Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)

Patient QI found a study that looked at the effects of parsley and two of its properties, Kaemfperol and Quercetin on uric acid levels and enzyme activity that can lead to gout.  It found that parsley and its properties increased antioxidant levels and decreased enzyme activity.  Administration of allopurinol showed higher significant effects on uric acid levels than that of parsley and its properties, but it did not significantly change the enzyme activity.  The study concluded that the features of parsley and its properties make them as a possible alternative for allopurinol, or at least in combination therapy to minimize the side effects of allopurinol to treat high uric acid levels.

 

Vitamin C

There are conflicting reports on the use of Vitamin C in gout sufferers.

One article Patient QI found pooled the findings of 2082 publications of trials looking at the effects of vitamin C supplementation on uric acid levels.  Results showed that there was a reducing effect on uric acid levels, and concluded that further trials are needed to determine whether vitamin C supplementation can reduce the risk of gout and its recurrence.

However, a study assessed the effects of vitamin C on uric acid levels in gout patients, and found no significant changes.  It acknowledged that although vitamin C seemed to significantly reduce uric acid levels in healthy subjects in previous studies, the effect was small on patients with gout.

 

Sesame Oil

Sesame oil has been used in traditional Taiwanese medicine to relieve the inflammatory pain in people with joint inflammation, toothache, scrapes, and cuts.  There has now been some scientific evidence to support the potential therapeutic effect sesame oil can have on inflammatory conditions, in an experimental study carried out in December 2013, where sesame oil significantly decreased levels of inflammatory responses.

The Gout - Food & Supplements page is regularly updated as new evidence is published in the medical journals.

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